fringeonfox
I just watched the Series Finale of FRINGE the other night. I absolutely loved this show! But more that anything, I loved Walter. John Noble’s performance was always nothing short of fantastic. 
And having done my fair share of psychedelics (and still a proponent of their use, though I haven’t partaken in several years), I loved Walter’s very open use and love of them. I do believe that Walter Bishop to be the first character on a US tv show to speak about hallucinogens in a positive light. They are always portrayed in US media and entertainment as being somehow more dangerous than coke, heroine, methamphetamine and the like. Which of course is a complete and utter fallacy.
While I will admit that Psychedelics can be dangerous and are not for everyone- given the proper setting, a mature attitude and a healthy respect for the substance in question, they can yield some very positive results. But all we ever hear about are the dangers they present and are inherent in their use. Again, another fallacy. 
To quote the immortal Bill Hicks, “You never see a positive drug story on the news. They always have the same LSD story. You’ve all seen it: ‘Today a young man on acid … thought he could fly … jumped out of a building … what a tragedy!’ What a dick. He’s an idiot. If he thought he could fly, why didn’t he take off from the ground first? Check it out? You don’t see geese lined up to catch elevators to fly south; they fly from the fucking ground. He’s an idiot. He’s dead. Good! We lost a moron? Fucking celebrate. There’s one less moron in the world. 
Wouldn’t you like to see a positive LSD story on the news? To base your decision on information rather than scare tactics and superstition? Perhaps? Wouldn’t that be interesting? Just for once? ‘Today, a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration – that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively. There is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Here’s Tom with the weather.’”
The fact that Walter attributes many of his and William Bell’s theory’s and inventions to their almost ritualistic use of Hallucinogens is pretty astounding. I think that it shows that people in this country may be more open towards having a dialog about these drugs. Hell, there were on more than one occasion, times where several characters from the show dropped acid and were able to save the day (sometimes the world) because they did so! That’s pretty groundbreaking.
Yes, those drugs can be dangerous. Yes, they’ve been known to harm people. Yes, there can be harmful long term side effects. But what drug doesn’t? Think about this; Alcohol and Tobacco products kill more people every year than crack, heroin and meth combined. And yet, are legal? That in and of itself is proof positive that the US “War On Drugs” is just a bunch of bullshit. 
But yeah, Fringe was awesome :)

I just watched the Series Finale of FRINGE the other night. I absolutely loved this show! But more that anything, I loved Walter. John Noble’s performance was always nothing short of fantastic. 

And having done my fair share of psychedelics (and still a proponent of their use, though I haven’t partaken in several years), I loved Walter’s very open use and love of them. I do believe that Walter Bishop to be the first character on a US tv show to speak about hallucinogens in a positive light. They are always portrayed in US media and entertainment as being somehow more dangerous than coke, heroine, methamphetamine and the like. Which of course is a complete and utter fallacy.

While I will admit that Psychedelics can be dangerous and are not for everyone- given the proper setting, a mature attitude and a healthy respect for the substance in question, they can yield some very positive results. But all we ever hear about are the dangers they present and are inherent in their use. Again, another fallacy. 

To quote the immortal Bill Hicks, “You never see a positive drug story on the news. They always have the same LSD story. You’ve all seen it: ‘Today a young man on acid … thought he could fly … jumped out of a building … what a tragedy!’ What a dick. He’s an idiot. If he thought he could fly, why didn’t he take off from the ground first? Check it out? You don’t see geese lined up to catch elevators to fly south; they fly from the fucking ground. He’s an idiot. He’s dead. Good! We lost a moron? Fucking celebrate. There’s one less moron in the world. 

Wouldn’t you like to see a positive LSD story on the news? To base your decision on information rather than scare tactics and superstition? Perhaps? Wouldn’t that be interesting? Just for once? ‘Today, a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration – that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively. There is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves. Here’s Tom with the weather.’”

The fact that Walter attributes many of his and William Bell’s theory’s and inventions to their almost ritualistic use of Hallucinogens is pretty astounding. I think that it shows that people in this country may be more open towards having a dialog about these drugs. Hell, there were on more than one occasion, times where several characters from the show dropped acid and were able to save the day (sometimes the world) because they did so! That’s pretty groundbreaking.

Yes, those drugs can be dangerous. Yes, they’ve been known to harm people. Yes, there can be harmful long term side effects. But what drug doesn’t? Think about this; Alcohol and Tobacco products kill more people every year than crack, heroin and meth combined. And yet, are legal? That in and of itself is proof positive that the US “War On Drugs” is just a bunch of bullshit. 

But yeah, Fringe was awesome :)

I just read that legendary comedian and actor Robin WIlliams was found dead in his home this morning of what appears to be a suicide. My feeling for this perfect stranger are so conflicted. Being born in ‘83, his movies were practically part of my family while I was growing up. So many fond memories.. As I entered my teens and developed an interest in Stand-Up comedy, I fell in love with his work all over again. He seemed to me to be the proverbial tortured artist, a deeply sad clown whose only reprieve from the insatiable void within himself was to bring laughter and happiness to other people. When I heard the news about him a short time ago, I was shocked, but not surprised to hear it looked to be a suicide. Having battled depression and suicidal thoughts for the better part of the last 15 years, I can recognize the silent agony hiding behind the eyes of those who have looked deep into the abyss. I had not thought about suicide in several years, a decent victory for me. But recently, those thoughts have found their way back into my head. I feel like Robin Williams death has shook me up a bit more than most, because I understand depression, as much as it is something that can be understood. I think I need to seek the help I’ve been telling myself I don’t need. I got a fortune cookie once many years ago that said, “It’s over your head now, time to seek professional help.” I remember reading that and thinking, “What the fuck kinda ‘fortune’ is that??” Feels like Mr WIlliams just told me the same thing. RIP Robin WIlliams, you were an immensely talented human being with a knack for making people feel good. The incredibly varied and excellent body of work you left behind will bring joy and entertainment for generations to come. I hope you found the peace that eluded you in life. 

Attached is a scene from one of my favorite movies of all time, the underrated dark comedy, Death to Smoochy. Robin shows an incredible amount of range in this scene with The Daily Show’s Jon Stewart.